ARTWORKS ARTISTS BOOKS SERVICES THE GALLERY EXHIBITION BLOG
Search Favorite Shopping Bag

koBen

Wasinburee Supanichvoraparch


Ceramics

Style
Traditional Thai Art

Subject
Nature

Medium
Ceramic


฿154,100



Details
The exhibition, X-Discipline: Designers Who Make Art, The value of clay depends on the interpretation. Soil is a natural metamorphic material that can change in different contexts. It is strong and durable when heated at the right temperature. KoBen is an attempt to simulate the shape of the soil as seen in nature as much as possible to show appreciation and acceptance of its natural beauty. We often overlook the value of what we walk through or trample on every day. This work was burned and coated with paint from Cobalt. For me, the blue from Cobalt symbolizes an element that helped connect and create more diversity in cultures around the world. Cobalt blue pottery originated from Persia before being developed and improved in China. The pottery continued to be imported to Europe from Asia and, during the 18th century, became a device for numerous leaders to achieve glory and power.They were one of the tools to represent an achievement of honor and power in the 18th century. This work uses the glaze painting technique in the style of Benjarong, an endeavor to create Thai pottery in the past. Its design suited the society in those days by bringing patterns inspired by nature and Thai beliefs. To create a piece different from the simple work available in those days. Even though there were some efforts to create unique works of Thai terracotta in different periods. In my idea, Benjarong is the most obvious starting point for applying modern techniques and design to pottery in that era. It shows the most obvious Thainess. Initially, we designed this in Thailand but had to produce it overseas under the problem of communication distortion. KoBen symbolizes a combination of the praise for natural splendor and the best suitable way to use nature to create inspiration. The work shows the history of Cobalt blue and the traditional Benjarong pattern that was designed and produced in Thailand. Finally, this series suggests how human beings choose to exploit nature to achieve their desires instead of creating the right balance and fulfillment between humans and nature, which can result in something sustainable and beautiful.